charchitect:

archatlas:

Antonio Sant’Elia

My senior project in Architecture School owed a lot to this architect. For a brief while I became obsessed with the ideas and aesthetics that he taught. Antonio Sant’Elia was an Italian architect, that left no built legacy but was a key member of the Futurist movement in architecture. The manifesto Futurist Architecture was published in August 1914:

"COMBAT AND DESPISE:

All the pseudo-architecture of the avant-garde, Austrian, Hungarian, German and American;

All classical architecture, solemn, hieratic, scenographic, decorative, monumental, pretty and pleasing;

The embalming, reconstruction and reproduction of ancient monuments and palaces;

Perpendicular and horizontal lines, cubical and pyramidical forms that are static, solemn, aggressive and absolutely excluded from our utterly new sensibility;

The use of massive, voluminous, durable, antiquated and costly materials.

AND PROCLAIM:

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Yesh

1 149 notas

archatlas:

San Telmo Museum  Nieto Sobejano Arquitectos

Our answer to this dilemma is represented by the image of a long, inhabited wall, whose plan evokes the distorted geometry of the cloister and the nearby military bastions where they meet the mountain. As an expression of a new discontinuity, the building/wall manifests the dualities—nature/artifice, contemporary sensibility/historical record—underlying the project. ”

719 notas

archatlas:

Champagne Maturing (under construction) by Ekler Architect

Images by Tamás Bujnovszky

545 notas

experimentsinmotion:

Tele-Present Water Simulates a Spot in the Pacific from Halfway Around the World

Artist David Bowen is known for his kinetic sculptures that are driven by real-world data from natural phenomenon. For his work “Tele-Present Water,” first exhibited at the National Museum in Wroclaw, Poland, Bowen pulled real-time wave intensity and frequency data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) buoy station 46246 (49°59’7″ N 145°5’20″ W) located in the remote Shumagin Islands of Alaska. This information was scaled and transferred to a mechanical grid structure, resulting in an uncanny live simulation of the movement of water from halfway around the world. The piece, along with Bowen’s other works, speaks to the way technology and telecommunications can both alienate us from and unite us with the natural world. While technology has enabled us to control and model phenomena with unprecedented precision, it may also provide a means to understand the world in a more intimate, visceral way. 

(Fuente: designboom.com)

1 966 notas